morkwalls:

writingfireandice:

volcanize:

This Explains Everything
I’m really proud of this one guys

WOW.

The most beautiful deconstruction of the ‘left brain” “right brain” stereotype that I’ve ever read. 

morkwalls:

writingfireandice:

volcanize:

This Explains Everything

I’m really proud of this one guys

WOW.

The most beautiful deconstruction of the ‘left brain” “right brain” stereotype that I’ve ever read. 

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VIA: lambhelps ORIGINALLY FROM: volcanize

Q: How to start a bio Roleplay 

acciorpc:

Some quick pointers to keep in mind. 

  • When writing your characters don’t rush to make it into a deadline. Treat evey character with the same amount of time. Sure some of them don’ need as many details as others, but try to keep them the same length and as interesting.
  • Create a bio layout so they all match.
  • Make sure they are all equally as important within the plot of the roleplay, don’t make some characters the center of the universe.
  • Don’t just give brief details if you are going to make the bios long and detailed. Really tell the story, make sure you are interested in the character, because if you are writing just to fill a word quota there is a good chance no one will be interested in him.
  • Make sure to keep all the characters diverse, and don’t be afraid to write a character who is not likeable. We all love villains there is a reason Draco became one of the most beloved characters in Harry Potter. Because he was very layered and people were very interested into his story. But not every character needs to have a dramatic background. Some are not as nice because of what they believe in.

Well, bio RP’s are not as difficult as they look and can be quite fun! It’s my favorite kind, here are some helpful links for your journey. I used my own masterlists links to find ones that were best for a bio RP.

Promoting & Tagging

Setting up an Application page and rejecting applications.

❆ How to Write

Writing original characters (for fandom RP’s that you need to add new characters, and to supply your applicants)

❆ Writing a lot

❆ Template

❆ Names

❆  Personality traits

❆ Faceclaims and diversity

❆ Extras:

Quirks/jobs and what not.

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VIA: alirambles ORIGINALLY FROM: acciorpc
thespookyprinceofinaba ASKED:
Sorry if something like this has been answered already but I have a question about character abilities, specifically how to make them seem not too op. Some of my protag characters accept a mission from a god/goddess of Greek myth and in turn receive some of their power. For the stronger gods I'm always sure to put lots of limits on their Hero's power but for one that controls time and space (stopping time for a short period, manipulating space between them and a target) I'm having trouble.

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

Overpowered is a relative term. If they are able to complete all challenges presented by the plot easily (or would be able to if they were smart enough to use their powers the right way), they are overpowered. If their powers help them along but they still have trouble because of how enormous their challenges are, they are not.

That said, an easy way to prevent a character with amazing powers from becoming OP is to make their powers create more problems than they solve. For example, you could give them no control over their powers, make their powers incredibly hard or dubiously moral to activate, give their powers such a hair trigger that they have to go out of their way to avoid using them, or make the person with the extreme powers the antagonist.

-Shannah (I need to remember to sign these I have been forgetting)

Anonymous ASKED:
By 'no prophecy unless the prophecy maker has an agenda' what does that mean? i.e. what would the prophecy maker having an agenda be like? Like if it's a fake prophecy but they put it out there because they're trying to use the prophecy to achieve their own end is that all right? because that's the premise of my book.

the-right-writing:

Kind of. It can also be:

  • A real, certain to happen prophecy where the facts are distorted to manipulate certain people (including the chosen one, who has a skill the prophecy maker needs) into helping the prophecy maker
  • In a world where the future can be seen, but only as multiple possible paths, a prophecy that predicts a specific path in order to manipulate people (including the chosen one, who has a skill the prophecy maker needs) into helping the prophecy maker
  • The prophecy maker can actually make things happen in the future by saying them.

There’s some overlap between the first three, depending on how much the facts are muddled. “Helping the prophecy maker” can also mean helping their family or their cause or anything else the prophecy maker would want to help.

Those are the only kind of prophecies that have anything more to them than “the author wants something to happen so it’s going to.”

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Keeping characters consistent 

writedemon:

In life the people we know are usually consistent to their own personalities and characters; whether this be consistently pessimistic or consistently unpredictable. keeping your characters as true to their, well, character isn’t always easy. Of course it helps if you know your charactersinside out, back to front and all around. They should be like people to you, like friends you never meet in person or old work colleagues you haven’t seen for a while. Once you know them it’s much easier to apply their unique personality to paper with consistency and efficiency. 

Here’s a checklist that will help you to do so;

  1. Consider their physical abilities (and awareness of them); most people are aware of their physical abilities and limitations, some think they’re Glasgow/Berlin/Atlanta’s answer to superman or catwoman. This is as much a part of their personality as anything else; an arrogant individual may think they can overcome their physical limits when they really have to, a delusional one may think they have no limits. Though the first is quite common, the second might hint at any number of factors that cloud the mind, think: alcohol, drugs, mental illness. If you want some quick advice on physical capabilities and how to exceed them see; Here and Here, respectively.
  2. Consider their personality; are they argumentative? Shy? Do they seek confrontation or actively avoid it? Remember a personality is made up of many facets; a person who looks for confrontation, has a short temper and is a staunch pessimist will react differently to a situation that someone who hold these qualities but is an optimist. While the first will see reasons to be angry and people to argue with more often, the second may need to be actively argued with or antagonised before they ‘snap’. They may also be more forgiving. 
  3. Consider the reality of the situations you put them in; almost every person, when cornered, when desperate, is capable of killing (mentally). It may be that they lack the physical capability to kill but no living creature is born without the desire to live and will to fight for survival. Arguably only a true saint or complete coward could face torture or certain death without fighting back. So think; is your character one of these types? Are they the kind of person who would lash out only as a last resort? Or the kind who uses violence of all kinds without guilt? Does your characters reaction to the situation you create fit them or do they act this way to service the story? If the second is true then you might need to reevaluate your character arc in order to bring them to a point where this act fits their psyche.
  4. Evaluate their motivation; it should be something that the reader, knowing your character, believes would move them to act in certain ways. We wouldn’t believe that, upon receiving good news, someone would become agitated and angry but if we were then told that for some reason this was not good news for them we would reevaluate our stance.  For example, consider the (fantastic) film ‘Steel magnolias’; in any normal circumstance we would be shocked that a mother would react badly to her daughters planned, consensual and desired pregnancy. But considering the fact that Shelby has severe diabetes and runs the risk of compromising her long term health with a pregnancy, suddenly, we understand her mother’s actions; she is fearful. She loves her daughter and thus is angry at what she sees as a flippant disregard for her own life.

By asking the right questions during the revision stage of writing you can easily determine where your characters are straying slightly, if it’s not already obvious to you as the author. The most reliable way to catch character deviations like this, however, is to give the story to someone else to read, someone who likes the genre you’re writing in, too. An interested reader will pick up on small falters in characterisation with the ruthless efficiency of a bloodhound and, if you pick the right person, they wont be afraid to tell you. If these issue come to your attention, no matter how, these four points can be used, also, to fashion a ‘repair’ for these issues. Just as you use them to confirm that actions are consistent with characterisation, you can use them to answer the question “If this is not what they’d do, what would they do?”

Is your kind and intelligent but quick tempered teacher realistically going to slap a child? No, probably not.

 So what would they do?

Well; a kind, intelligent, quick tempered teach might physically lash out at a pupil if they;

  1. Were facing physical violence from a pupil and had no other options; not to be crude but anyone would lash out if faced with assault, rape, murder or extreme humiliation.
  2. Were under the influence of mind, and therefore, personality altering substances; drugs/drink etc. Some antidepressants, on the rare occasion, can induce anger in an individual.
  3. Had experienced something that altered them as a person for good; we’re not talking the boiler breaking down or a partner cheating. We’re talking loss of life, limb or individuals; we’re talking stuck in an elevator for three days, forced to survive on a kitkat and tear open the rusted escape hatch with your fingernails. Real, permanent and irreversible change of a person’s psychological fingerprint requires a high impact situation. Certainly it needn’t be a physical situation but it should match the corresponding change in magnitude.

Lacking real change they’re likely to;

  1. Bite their tongue and soldier on; someone with a passion for teaching would most likely wish to help all their pupils, even the troublesome ones. Especially if this person were also inherently kind. 
  2. Shout or, verbally, lose their temper; they might feel guilty afterwards, or remonstrate themselves for lacking in professionalism. 
  3. Turn the anger inward and, if the situation is long term, persistent and severe, self destruct.

This is a limited example but, I hope, is helpful nonetheless. 

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VIA: its-a-writer-thing ORIGINALLY FROM: writedemon
Anonymous ASKED:
I'm writing a fantasy novel with a completely new earth, although I am using existing cultures to draw from for certain places. I kept thinking to myself: is it wrong to pick and choose? There are so many diverse cultures and I wanted to show a good portion in my story, but at the same time I didn't want to lump everything together because I know "Africa" is made up of many different peoples and cultures. I guess what I'm asking is: is it problematic to pick certain cultures to draw from?

writingwithcolor:

World building: New Earth and Choosing Cultures

I don’t think it’s problematic to pick a certain culture to draw inspiration from. You might be more familiar with one specific or have access to more research compared to one culture from another. You obviously can’t pick all of the cultures because you might as well just set your story in our world. So if you choose one culture and draw inspiration from there, I believe that is fine as long as you do your research and present the culture respectfully.

Things get problematic when you pick from different cultures and attempt to mash them up together. This post covers that more in depth. You might run the risk of having two things in your world that actually don’t make sense in reality.

~Mod Najela

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Action Stations!!! 

mooderino:

image

There are some basic rules to writing action in fiction that are straightforward and make sense. Keep sentences short to add pace. Be clear and use simple language when describing complicated moves. Show don’t tell.

This doesn’t just apply to fights and chases. Any confrontation, any physical movement, any visual scene will have an action element to it. However, you can’t just replicate Hollywood movie visuals, the picture in the reader’s head won’t automatically have the same impact as stunt-work on the big screen. You have to find a way to translate what’s on the page into an emotional experience for the reader.

Read More

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VIA: characterandwritinghelp ORIGINALLY FROM: mooderino
sixpenceee:

STAGES OF DEATH
Moment of death:The heart stops, the skin gets tight and grey in color, all the muscles relax, the bladder and bowels empty
After 30 minutes:The skin gets purple and waxy, the lips, finger- and toe nails fade to a pale color or turn white as the blood leaves, blood pools at the lowest parts of the body leaving a dark purple-black stain called lividity, the hands and feet turn blue, the eyes start to sink into the skull
After 4 hours:Rigor mortis starts to set in, the purpling of the skin and pooling of blood continue, rigor mortis begins to tighten the muscles for about another 24 hours, then will reverse and the body will return to a limp state.
After 24 hours:The body is now the temperature of the surrounding environment. In males, the semen dies. The head and neck are now a greenish-blue color. The greenish-blue color continues to spread to the rest of the body. There is the strong smell of rotting meat.
After 3 days:The gases in the body tissues form large blisters on the skin, the whole body begins to bloat and swell grotesquely. This process is speeded up if victim is in a hot environment, or in water. Fluids leak from the mouth, nose, eyes, ears and rectum and urinary opening.
After 3 weeks:The skin, hair, and nails are so loose they can be easily pulled off the corpse. The skin cracks and bursts open in many places because of the pressure of Internal gases and the breakdown of the skin itself
Any more time:Decomposition will continue until body is nothing but skeletal remains, which can take as little as a month in hot climates and two months in cold climates. The teeth are often the only thing left, years and centuries later, because tooth enamel is the strongest substance in the body.
SOME TERMINOLOGY
Pallor Mortis (paleness of death):Almost immediately after death a body of a person with light skin will begin to grow very pale. this is caused by a lack of blood in the capillary region of the blood vessel. 
Algor mortis(cooling of death): After death a human body will no longer be working to keep warm, and as a result will start cooling. 
Rigor Mortis(death stiffness): About three hours after death a chemical change in the muscles of a human corpse causes the limbs of the corpse to become stiff and difficult to move. 
Livor Mortis(bluish color of death) or postmortem lividity: Within 6-12 hours after death a humans body will no longer have a pumping heart to circulate all the blood that is in the body, because of this there is nothing to stop the effect of gravity, and all the blood will start to move with gravity towards the part of the body closest to the ground causing a purplish red discoloration of the skin..
Here’s a video on body farms (where they study decomposition) 
Here’s a video on a time lapse of an actual decomposing body (NSFW, I wouldn’t watch this if I was eating) 

sixpenceee:

STAGES OF DEATH

  • Moment of death:The heart stops, the skin gets tight and grey in color, all the muscles relax, the bladder and bowels empty
  • After 30 minutes:The skin gets purple and waxy, the lips, finger- and toe nails fade to a pale color or turn white as the blood leaves, blood pools at the lowest parts of the body leaving a dark purple-black stain called lividity, the hands and feet turn blue, the eyes start to sink into the skull
  • After 4 hours:Rigor mortis starts to set in, the purpling of the skin and pooling of blood continue, rigor mortis begins to tighten the muscles for about another 24 hours, then will reverse and the body will return to a limp state.
  • After 24 hours:The body is now the temperature of the surrounding environment. In males, the semen dies. The head and neck are now a greenish-blue color. The greenish-blue color continues to spread to the rest of the body. There is the strong smell of rotting meat.
  • After 3 days:The gases in the body tissues form large blisters on the skin, the whole body begins to bloat and swell grotesquely. This process is speeded up if victim is in a hot environment, or in water. Fluids leak from the mouth, nose, eyes, ears and rectum and urinary opening.
  • After 3 weeks:The skin, hair, and nails are so loose they can be easily pulled off the corpse. The skin cracks and bursts open in many places because of the pressure of Internal gases and the breakdown of the skin itself
  • Any more time:Decomposition will continue until body is nothing but skeletal remains, which can take as little as a month in hot climates and two months in cold climates. The teeth are often the only thing left, years and centuries later, because tooth enamel is the strongest substance in the body.

SOME TERMINOLOGY

  • Pallor Mortis (paleness of death):Almost immediately after death a body of a person with light skin will begin to grow very pale. this is caused by a lack of blood in the capillary region of the blood vessel. 
  • Algor mortis(cooling of death): After death a human body will no longer be working to keep warm, and as a result will start cooling. 
  • Rigor Mortis(death stiffness): About three hours after death a chemical change in the muscles of a human corpse causes the limbs of the corpse to become stiff and difficult to move. 
  • Livor Mortis(bluish color of death) or postmortem lividity: Within 6-12 hours after death a humans body will no longer have a pumping heart to circulate all the blood that is in the body, because of this there is nothing to stop the effect of gravity, and all the blood will start to move with gravity towards the part of the body closest to the ground causing a purplish red discoloration of the skin..

Here’s a video on body farms (where they study decomposition) 

Here’s a video on a time lapse of an actual decomposing body (NSFW, I wouldn’t watch this if I was eating) 

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VIA: lazyresources ORIGINALLY FROM: sixpenceee
Anonymous ASKED:
Should size and weight be put into consideration when picking a weapon that a character is going to use most of the time in fighting? Or is it more about training, or both?

howtofightwrite:

I assume we’re talking about weapons, in which case, size and weight are both very important considerations, though possibly not for the reasons you’d think.

Size is critical for determining reach. This is how far you can reach out and impale someone. Generally speaking, longer weapons have a significant advantage over shorter ones. I say “generally” because there are a ton of specific exceptions, but if you can stab someone before they can reach you, that’s a combat advantage.

Weight is a major issue, but it’s never about being able to lift a weapon, (unless we’re talking about weapons designed to be used from an emplacement, like the M2 Browning) it’s about how agile the weapon is, and making sure that you can carry and use it all day.

This is why the heaviest swords intended for combat rarely exceed 8lbs. It needed to be light enough that its wielder could carry it and a couple other weapons and use them during constant physical exertion.

That “intended for combat” bit is a fairly important distinction, though. Parade swords were the historical equivalent of your friend’s gaudy katana display. They were there to look cool, not to be useful. Parade swords could get into the 20lb range. Some of those are amazing pieces of art in their own right, but they’re not practical weapons.

If we’re talking about your character? Then size and weight aren’t major considerations. Overall physical fitness is vitally important, but beyond that weight isn’t a huge issue. Depending on climate and diet, weight is semi-independent of physical fitness. I realize that may sound insane, but particularly in cold climates, it’s entirely possible for someone to bulk up while maintaining a layer of fat as insulation.

Size isn’t a huge issue unless your character is unusually large or unusually small. Characters that are less than a foot taller (or shorter) than their opponent should have roughly similar (unarmed) reach.

That said, shorter individuals do have lower centers of gravity, which makes it much easier for them to get into more stable stances.

It’s worth pointing out that: women have a lower center of gravity for their height than men.

-Starke

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VIA: its-a-writer-thing ORIGINALLY FROM: howtofightwrite
kaiju-cat ASKED:
A comic of mine will include a lot of cultures based on ones in the real world, and some of them include Mesoamerican and South American cultures such as the Aztecs, Olmecs, Mayas, and Incans. In both looking up information about these cultures and in fictional works, I've noticed that there is a heavy focus on graphic human sacrifices. I want to be respectful the culture to be accurate, but at the same time I don't want to categorize the culture as violent and savage. Any advice?

writingwithcolor:

epperanalchemist:

writingwithcolor:

Respectful Research on Cultures

You should keep in mind that most of the resources on cultures are written from outside of the culture. A lot of historical documents which come up first when you look things up tend to be racist as well.

The parts of the human sacrifice are probably in reality a bit different from how they were described. Per example, the druids are also known for massive human sacrifices etc, but because there are little sources written by druids themselves, it is hard to see which parts are true and which are exaggerated.

The best thing to do is, try to imagine you are part of the culture. Be very open-minded and think about why you’d be a part of these parts of the culture. Why did they do it? Why would you do it? Was it necessary to them? Why? Etc.

~Mod Alice

It may be worth the effort to dig for sources that aren’t so “sacrifice-heavy.” There’s way more to these cultures than that aspect and most sources are, as Alice mentioned, coming from racist perspectives.

They’re also honing in on what they find most “interesting” or has been popularized in regards to these cultures. For example, there’s more to Ancient Egypt than Cleopatra, pyramids and mummies, and yet these topics tend to dominate discussion.

It might be tough, but seek honest sources that aren’t there to entice, and if possible, primary documentation.

~Mod Colette

Just a few things to add, having looked into this particular topic before:
Human sacrifice exaggerations happen on both ends, as for Mesoamerican cultures it was often a point of pride.
For Mayan Civilization, make sure your source was written AFTER the Maya language was translated. The Maya were alot more violent then initially believed (they were about maybe a bit more violent then most civilizations at the time).
And, though it might be a bit strange sounding, your best sources are probably going to be modern(Sadly) since most primary sources dealing with culture were quite literally rounded up and burned.  Academic papers would be a good place to look, given they rarely are aimed at the general public. 

Thank you for this extra info! 

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